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Destination Beardsley

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One step ahead, three back.

That's what the Fourth of July holiday brought me, after I took the Fourth and July 5 off. Instead of running and training, I played horseshoes, sat by a fire and soaked in a lot of sun.

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Sunday I walked off some cobwebs and decided to try and make up for my missed time by doing a little extra work this past week.

I noticed the jump from three minutes of running to five minutes a lot. Monday, I had to run on the treadmill in the basement of the newspaper since it was downpouring (I tried running in the rain and it wasn't a pleasant experience).

Tuesday was back outside and I tried to keep up with the five minutes of running, but with the heat (yes, I know, excuses, excuses), I was walking by the third or fourth minute.

The problem didn't come from being tired aerobically, but my lower legs. I'm finding out better running techniques to combat fatigue in my shins and calves - like running more upright.

Wednesday I sort of had to take a day off, but it ended up being more exhaustive than running. I took to the task of sawing down three of my willow trees -- with the help from my dad -- and that ended up being an all-day project.

So in essence, I was able to have a good workout, despite missing my 5K training class.

Thursday was the day I was expecting when I started training. It was hot and I pushed myself to the max.

I took the bike trail which starts near the bowling alley and ran the majority of it to Dunton Locks. By the time the road curved around the Lake Sallie portion, a pretty large hill loomed in front of me.

What the heck, I decided to take it hard. With Nash panting next to me, we both lunged up the paved hill.

By the time I reached the top, I felt like I was wearing a suit of concrete and the colors of the rainbow were flashing in front of my eyes.

So I figured, this was that time my body would be splurged along side of the road and a passer-by gets to see what I had for lunch earlier that day.

Thankfully, a little rest helped and I was able to make it back to my car without feeding the chipmunks.

That experience was a bit humbling, because it showed me I have a ways to go yet, on my quest for Sept. 6.

Oh well, Rome wasn't built in a day.

Doug Schulberg's Entry No. 1

Doug Schulberg will be the guest writer for the Half-Marathon portion of the "Destination Beardsley" series.

Here is his first entry:

Some people can stay fit and trim with an occasional work out or passing up a few desserts; not me.

On the back side of the winter of 2006-07 I found I had gained an additional 15 pounds and, I'm pretty sure now, it was not all muscle.

That wouldn't have been so alarming if those 15 pounds were not on top of the 15 pounds I had somehow grown in the preceding 10 years.

Of course like a lot of people I was a "normal" 15 pounds overweight most of my adult life. When added up (15+15+15=45), I was facing a pants problem. So in March of 2007 I started to run with a goal within a goal first to run the Beardsley Half-Marathon, and second to lose enough weight so I wouldn't die in the process.

Holly Heisserer somehow knew I needed some help (a God thing) and she called me up and ask if I would I like to join a group of runners training for the Fargo Marathon.

I had my suspicion confirmed, carrying a back-pack full of books, a bowling ball and an extra bag full of groceries made it difficult to keep pace with a bunch of marathon runners.

By last September's Beardsley I was down to a normal overweight, after having rediscovered most of my old sports injuries and a few new and interesting problems.

After completing the run in a satisfactory time I had to hang up my shoes for a good month to let the injuries heal, but I was hooked.

I now have two 10K's and two half-marathons under my belt and feel it's time to learn a little bit about what I'm doing as a runner.

Angie (Johnson) has impressed me as a knowledgeable trainer and runner, and also being accountable to a group seems to make running feel more like a real sport.

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