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Fish the wind in the fall

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The fall bite is in full swing across the Midwest. There are several things to keep in mind when fishing this time of year if an angler wants to be successful. One of those things is to spend most of your time fishing windblown areas.

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Fishing the areas that the wind is blowing into is a good idea most of the time. However, in the fall, the wind can be a little uncomfortable and cold. Sometimes we have a tendency to fish the calmer areas in the fall. By doing so, we stay warmer, and we can also enjoy the brilliant colors on the trees, the migrating waterfowl, and the beautiful weather. However, we can do all those things from shore. If we're fishing, we should put ourselves in a position to catch more fish. Most of the time that will be in the windblown locations.

I just returned from a fishing trip to the Iowa Great Lakes region of northwest Iowa. These lakes are similar in ways to many of the lakes found in the Midwest. There are good weedlines, a mix of shallow and deep water, and a variety of fish species. We were fishing for largemouth bass.

The wind had been blowing from the same direction for several days. We started off fishing a windblown weedline. We caught fish.

Then we moved to a windblown point. We caught fish.

We moved to another windblown weedline. Caught more fish.

Next stop was a weedline in a bay that was protected from the wind. Bite was much, much slower.

We moved to another windblown point. The fish were there and ready to bite. It was apparent that the wind was positioning the fish, and if we wanted to experience success, we needed to be fishing the wind. This was no surprise, but when you go fishing, it's a good idea to check out the different variables to see if you can determine where and how you can catch the most fish.

It was also apparent that the bass wanted larger baits. We caught them good on seven inch Power Worms. When action slowed, we tried four inch Power Worms. That's usually a good idea when the fish are being finicky, but in the fall, big baits are almost always the way to go. If they're going to eat, they will prefer bigger baits, and the bigger baits will also usually catch the bigger fish.

It generally doesn't matter if you're after walleyes, muskies, northern pike, largemouth or smallmouth bass: In the fall, if you want to experience success, you should be fishing areas that the wind is blowing into. Boat control might be a little more difficult, and you might need to put on another jacket, but you won't mind doing those things when you discover the benefits of fishing in the wind.

(For more fish-catching information, visit fishingthemidwest.com.)

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