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Get a ‘New Deal’ at your DL library

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With the economy bouncing back from a major recession, we all know hard times are possible.

But those who experienced the “Great Depression” will attest to the fact that we haven’t got a clue how bad things can get! 

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The Civilian Conserva-tion Corps (CCC) was one of President Roosevelt’s New Deal Programs. It put millions of young unemployed, unmarried men to work at a time when there were no jobs, and most of their families desperately needed the money.

“Hard Work and a Good Deal: The Civilian Conservation Corps in Minnesota,” by Barbara W. Sommer.

“Hard Work and a Good Deal” traces the history of the Civilian Conservation Corps, which supplied jobs to more than 77,000 Minnesotans during the Great Depression.

Nearly 100 interviews contribute to oral historian Barbara W. Sommer’s lively narrative as the “boys” look back on their time in the CCC, during which many of them became men.

African American enrollees tell of the segregated policies enforced in the army-run camps; workers for the CCC-Indian Division remember reservation projects that included rebuilding a fur trade-era stockade at Grand Portage. Together, these men give voice to early efforts that advanced the conservation of Minnesota’s natural resources five decades in a few short years.

“Our Mark on This Land: A Guide to the Legacy of the Civilian Conservation Corps in America’s Parks,” by Ren and Helen Davis. 

The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) was established in March, 1933, as one of the first initiatives of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s administration.

The purpose of the CCC was to put unemployed young men to work performing conservation and related activities amidst the depths of the Great Depression while simultaneously striving to restore the bodies, minds, and spirits of the men themselves.

With unprecedented cooperation among federal agencies, this hugely successful effort became the largest peacetime mobilization in our nation s history.

Library happenings

  • Tuesday, May 14: Introduction to LARL’s Digital Library, 10:30 a.m.  Did you know you can download books from the Library? Learn about searching our digital catalog for ebooks, the various formats we support and the various help options available for getting started. Class size is limited to six people. Call, e-mail, or stop by the Library to register.
  • Tuesday, May 14: “Story Time at Storyland,” 6:30 p.m., Becker County Museum, 714 Summit Ave. A special library storytime at Storyland. Storyland is a traveling exhibit from the Minnesota Children’s Museum which is on display at the county museum in Detroit Lakes until the end of May.
  • Wednesday, May 15: “eReader Help,” 4:30 p.m.  Schedule a one-on-one appointment to address your eReader questions.
  • Wednesday, May 15: Christian Book Club, 6:30 p.m. Discuss “When I Lay My Isaac Down” by Carol Kent.
  • Thursday, May 16 and Saturday, May 18: Preschool Storytime, 10:30 a.m.

Library hours

The Detroit Lakes Library, located at 1000 Washington Ave., is open Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Thursdays and Fridays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturdays.

It is closed on Sundays.

For more information on Detroit Lakes Library services and programs, please call 218-847-2168 or visit the website at www.larl.org.

Article written by Danell Haspel of the Detroit Lakes Library

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