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Howard Kossover: There are many aspects to requirements for Social Security disability

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life Detroit Lakes, 56501
Detroit Lakes Minnesota 511 Washington Avenue 56501

Q: An accident injury prevents me from returning to work. Can I get Social Security disability?

A: Filing an application is the only way to receive a formal decision.

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While inability to return to previous work is part of the requirements, the Social Security medical decision includes much more.

In general, in addition to the work requirement, to be found disabled under Social Security rules you cannot do the work that you did before, you cannot adjust to other work because of your medical conditions, and your disability has lasted or is expected to last for at least one year or to result in death.

Age, work experience and education are considered in the decision. Learn about Social Security disability, or file an application online, at www.socialsecurity.gov/pgm/disability.htm.

Did you know? On August 14, 1935, 78 years ago, the Social Security Act became law when President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed H.R. 7260, Public Law No. 271. The Social Security Act of 1935 included much more than what we now think of as Social Security.

The Act also included unemployment insurance, old-age assistance, aid to dependent children and grants to the states to provide various forms of medical care.

What we think of as Social Security is only Title II (Federal Old-Age Benefits) of the Act. Since 1935, Title II of the Social Security Act has evolved into the three Social Security programs of today, known as OASDI for Old Age (Retirement), Survivors and Disability Insurance.

Nationally as of December 2012, approximately 18.1 percent of the United States population receives a monthly SSA benefit of some type.

About 17.5 percent of the North Dakota population receives Social Security, 17.2 percent in Minnesota, and 19.1 percent in South Dakota.

More about the original Social Security Act and the evolution of Social Security is available at www.socialsecurity.gov/history.

Based in Grand Forks, Howard I. Kossover is the Social Security Public Affairs Specialist for North Dakota and western Minnesota. Send general interest questions to him at howard.kossover@ssa.gov. Read his online articles at socialsecurityinfo.areavoices.com.

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