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Children gather around Brandan Melina, 6, center, as he reads some words in Ojibwe from a flash book teachers at the Mahnomen Child Care Center use to help students learn the language. Photo by - Brian Basham

An Ojibwe language revival

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There's no arguing the fact that the Ojibwe language is a dying one.

"It's in the critical stages of being a language lost," said Assistant Education Director for the White Earth Reservation, Mary Otto, who says very few people on White Earth speak the language now, and most of those that do are elders.

But all that could soon be changing.

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