Sections

Weather Forecast

Close

Why do we celebrate MLK Day?

1 / 2
2 / 2

Did you know the first legislation to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s birth was introduced just months after his assassination in 1968? And did you know that the first official holiday was observed on the third Monday in January, 1986?

As you can guess, a lot took place between his assassination and January 1986 to get the bill to pass. Coretta Scott King (his wife) teamed up with a lot of people to work toward their goal. Stevie Wonder wrote and sang "Happy Birthday" in 1980, which became a rallying cry in the fight for passage of the bill. If you would like to read more about Dr. King, we would love to see you in the library!

"Be a King: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s Dream and You," by Carole Boston Weatherford.

Featuring a dual narrative of the key moments of Dr. King's life alongside a modern class as the students learn about him, Carole Weatherford's poetic text encapsulates the moments that readers today can reenact in their own lives. See a class of young students as they begin a school project inspired by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and learn to follow his example, as he dealt with adversity and never lost hope that a future of equality and justice would soon be a reality.

As times change, Dr. King's example remains, encouraging a new generation of children to take charge and change the world... to be a King. Preschool -3rd grade reading level.

"Kennedy and King the President, the Pastor, and the Battle Over Civil Rights," Steven Levingston.

"Kennedy and King" traces the emergence of two of the 20th century's greatest leaders, their powerful impact on each other and on the shape of the civil rights battle between 1960 and 1963. These two men from starkly different worlds profoundly influenced each other's personal development. Kennedy's hesitation on civil rights spurred King to greater acts of courage, and King inspired Kennedy to finally make a moral commitment to equality. As America still grapples with the legacy of slavery and the persistence of discrimination, Kennedy and King is a vital, vivid contribution to the literature of the Civil Rights Movement.

Library Happenings

The library's monthly Book Discussion Group is scheduled for Tuesday, Jan. 16 at 3 p.m. in the main meeting room of the Detroit Lakes Public Library. Join fellow book lovers in discussing Longbourn by Jo Baker. This group is open to all — even if you haven't read the book.

A children's program, "Weird but True Fest," is scheduled for Thursday, Jan. 18 at 4 p.m. in the library's main meeting room. Join us as we explore the world of Weird But True facts! Explore the strange but true with activities, crafts, and snack! For kids in grades K-5.

Preschool Storytime: Preschoolers and their caregivers are invited to join us for Storytime on Thursday, Jan.18 and Saturday, Jan. 20 at 10:30 a.m. A different theme is explored each week. Daycares and other large groups are asked to call ahead.

Library hours

The Detroit Lakes Public Library's regular hours are as follows: Monday-Thursday from 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; Friday from 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; and Saturday from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. It is closed on Sundays and all national holidays.

For more information on local library services and programs, please call 218-847-2168 or visit your Library at 1000 Washington Ave.

Detroit Lakes Library is a branch of Lake Agassiz Regional Library (LARL), a consolidated public library system comprised of 13 branch libraries and nine LINK sites serving the residents of seven counties in northwest Minnesota. More information is available at www.larl.org, and the library's app, LARL Mobile, is available in the iTunes and Google Play stores for free download.

Advertisement
randomness