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Home-grown talent: Crookston siblings--triplets and a single--may be featured on HGTV as reality house-flipping stars

Sheryl and Dean Adams, with triplets (from left) Roman, Serenity and Kazmir, and daughter Precious, survey their current project house in Crookston, Minn., that the family is renovating. Eric Hylden / Forum News Service1 / 3
(Left to right) Siblings Kazmir, Roman, Precious and Serenity Adams of Crookston, Minn., are hoping that their experience helping their parents flip houses since they were about 6 years old will land them a show on HGTV. Eric Hylden / Forum News Service2 / 3
Precious Adams gives directions to her older brother, Kazmir, as the family works to stage a house that they flipped in Crookston, Minn., recently. Eric Hylden / Forum News Service3 / 3

CROOKSTON, Minn. — Ever since they were about 6 or 7 years old, the Adams children have helped their parents work on renovating older homes for resale — starting out with tasks like fetching tools or sweeping out debris and moving on to buying, remodeling and reselling homes as teenagers.

Now, as experienced house-flippers, Precious, 19, and triplets Serenity, Kazmir and Roman, 20, may have a chance to show their stuff on a reality show on HGTV, the network dedicated to all things home and garden.

Sheryl and Dean Adams of rural Crookston are preparing the final audiovisual pieces that HGTV has requested in order to make a decision about running the show.

In the past week or so, Sheryl Adams gathered furniture and accessories to stage an empty house in Crookston. She took video clips and photos of the kids furnishing and staging the house Saturday, following instructions of a California-based TV producer who pitched the project to HGTV.

"They (HGTV) liked it right away," Sheryl said.

The producer, Matt Soloman of Ugly Brother Studio in Culver City, Calif., has asked for visuals of the kids hauling furniture into the house, talking about what should be done to restore it, and staging the house for sale.

Sheryl has been communicating with Soloman via Skype, email and phone for the past year or so, laying the groundwork for the possible show, she said.

Their conversations have been riddled with references to Chip and Joanna Gaines, whose wildly popular show "Fixer Upper" is reportedly in it final season.

Sheryl has been asked, "Can you find a pillow like Joanna would use?" she said.

She's been asked to stage a home in the farmhouse style and include in the rooms items such as a live plant — again, reminiscent of Joanna Gaines' style.

Sheryl and her husband, Dean, are adamant that any show that might be developed not interfere with their kids' education.

Roman and Kazmir are second-year students in the heating, ventilation and air conditioning, or HVAC, program at Moorhead State Community and Technical College.They plan to graduate in the spring.

Precious is a sophomore at St. Cloud State University where she is majoring in global business.

If the show is picked up, the family could see production get underway next summer, Sheryl said.

The family had to meet several requirements to arrive at this point, Sheryl said.

"We had to prove we financially could afford to do this, that we could do 10 houses in a year," which shouldn't be a problem because "we did four houses this year — and that was with three kids in college."

'Next generation'

Although no title has been proposed, the concept of the show would focus on "the next generation," Sheryl said.

She isn't sure if HGTV wants to play up the triplets as an angle, she said, but she was told that the fact that the show would feature triplets "was just a plus."

Each of the kids would have a particular role: Precious would take the designer role, do the painting and stage the homes, Roman would handle the demolition, Kazmir would "put it back together," and Serenity would be "our jack-of-all-trades," Sheryl said. "Serenity would do everything from shingling the room to hauling stuff into the house."

In case the show is picked up, Sheryl has been "scouting out other houses to buy," she said. "They (HGTV) want homes with lots of character and charm."

The idea that she and her siblings may be cast in an HGTV show "hasn't really processed yet," Precious said.

"If anything, it'll just be a good opportunity for us," Roman said.

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