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5 p.m.: Expert dismissed as court adjourns for the day

In this still image from video, retired police officer and use-of-force consultant Barry Brodd testifies in the trial of Derek Chauvin on Tuesday, April 13. (Forum News Service)
In this still image from video, retired police officer and use-of-force consultant Barry Brodd testifies in the trial of Derek Chauvin on Tuesday, April 13. (Forum News Service)

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Though at first he said being laid on the ground in a prone position, as George Floyd was before he died, does not constitute a use of force, Barry Brodd said it actually could be if it causes pain. Shown a still image from bystander footage of Chauvin kneeling on Floyd's neck, Brodd told prosecutors Tuesday that the act could possibly have done that.

And using pain-producing techniques on a compliant suspect, he said, is not considered justifiable. According to Brodd's review of arrest footage and related materials, though, Floyd did appear to be resisting arrest at points, even as he lay on the ground.

Brodd also reiterated his stance that Chauvin did not have to place Floyd on his side in the recovery position due to space limitations caused by the squad car and crowd.,

Court is in recess until Wednesday, April 14 at 8:45 a.m., when a motions hearing will be held.

2 p.m.: Chauvin showed 'objective reasonableness,' expert says

A retired police officer and use-of-force consultant said Thursday afternoon that Derek Chauvin was "justified" and his interactions with George Floyd.

Barry Brodd, who said he has reviewed 140 cases and testified in 10, told Chauvin's defense attorney he reached that conclusion after looking at video footage, miscellaneous statements and training records pertaining to Floyd's arrest and death on May 25, 2020.

"I felt that Derek Chauvin was justified, was acting with objective reasonableness, following Minneapolis Police Department policy and current standards of law enforcement in his interactions with Mr. Floyd," he said.

Brodd said he has done work in the past for the Minneapolis city attorney's office and offered to do so again in this case, though that offer was declined. He was then contacted by Chauvin's defense team.

Notably, Brodd also testified in the trial of the Chicago police officer who fatally shot Laquan McDonald in 2014, whose actions he also said were justified.

12:30 p.m.: Police trainer talks more about 'excited delirium'

Minneapolis Police medical support coordinator Officer Nicole Mackenzie answers questions Tuesday, April 6, 2021, during the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin in the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. (Pool via REUTERS)
Minneapolis Police medical support coordinator Officer Nicole Mackenzie answers questions Tuesday, April 6, 2021, during the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin in the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. (Pool via REUTERS)

A medical support coordinator and trainer for the Minneapolis Police Department was recalled as a witness shortly before the trial of Derek Chauvin paused for an afternoon break.

Officer Nicole Mackenzie was asked by Chauvin's defense attorney about the signs, symptoms and causes of excited delirium that officers are trained to look out for and respond to. The controversial syndrome, which several major medical organizations do not recognize, is characterized by aggressive behavior, profuse sweating and confusion.

EARLIER: Minneapolis police officers testify to the training they — and Derek Chauvin himself — receive

She said police cadets are trained about excited delirium and that more senior officers are taught about it through in-service training. Once apprehended, according to Mackenzie, suspects thought to be experiencing excited delirium are to be laid on their side in the recovery position.

Officers are also trained to perform CPR and similar first-aid measures on suspects who become unresponsive in the course of arrest, she said.

11:40 a.m. Park police officer testifies

In this still image from video taken, Minneapolis Park Police Officer Peter Chang testifies in the trial of Derek Chauvin on Tuesday, April 13 about his involvement in George Floyd's arrest in May of last year. (Forum News Service)
In this still image from video taken, Minneapolis Park Police Officer Peter Chang testifies in the trial of Derek Chauvin on Tuesday, April 13 about his involvement in George Floyd's arrest in May of last year. (Forum News Service)

Minneapolis Park Police Officer Peter Chang, who responded to the scene George Floyd's May 25, 2020, arrest, testified briefly this morning as a witness for Derek Chauvin's defense.

Footage from Chang's body-worn camera was played in court, most of which showed him talking Shawanda Hill and Morries Hall, who were inside Floyd's car at the time police approached him. The three of them remained by the car while city police officers took Floyd across the street, partially out of their view. At points in the video, they could be heard asking about what was happening to Floyd.

According to Chang, the crowd of onlookers that gathered across the street around Floyd as he was being restrained was behaving aggressively. He described the south Minneapolis intersection where the arrest took place as a busy one and told jurors that he was concerned about the other officers' safety.

Upon being cross-examined, Chang told prosecutors that he did see Floyd complying with the officer who initially took down his personal information. But he said he did not see much of Floyd's later interactions with the other officers, who he confirmed did not radio for more help.

Jurors also heard this morning from Hill herself, who testified that she ran into Floyd at the Cup Foods convenience store on May 25, 2020 and that he offered her a ride home. He appeared talkative and "happy" inside the store, she said.

In this still image from video, Shawanda Hill testifies in the trial of Derek Chauvin on April 13. Hill was one of the two individuals who were with George Floyd when Minneapolis Police Department officers arrested him on May 25, 2020. (Forum News Service)
In this still image from video, Shawanda Hill testifies in the trial of Derek Chauvin on April 13. Hill was one of the two individuals who were with George Floyd when Minneapolis Police Department officers arrested him on May 25, 2020. (Forum News Service)


After getting into the car with Floyd and Hall, who may yet be called to testify, Hill said Floyd fell asleep. She told jurors that she tried to wake him as Minneapolis police officers approached, and that he became startled upon seeing them.

He asked the officers not to shoot or kill him as they asked him to place his hands on the steering wheel, she said.

PREVIOUSLY: Police sergeant: Restraint on George Floyd should have ended when he stopped resisting

10:15 a.m.: Defense calls first witnesses

Prosecutors pursuing murder and manslaughter charges against Derek Chauvin said they would rest their case Tuesday morning, April 13.

Chauvin's defense team then called their first witness, retired Minneapolis Police Officer Scott Creighton. Creighton, a member of the force for more than 20 years, was asked to testify about a May 2019 traffic stop he and George Floyd were involved in.

Judge Peter Cahill said Creighton's testimony and body-worn camera footage from the traffic stop were being used to demonstrate "what ingestion of opioids may or may not have had on physical well-being of George Floyd" and that "this evidence is not to be used as evidence of the character of George Floyd."

He was questioned only briefly and has since been dismissed. Michelle Moseng, a retired Hennepin County Medical Center paramedic, then testified briefly as to the care she rendered Floyd following his May 2019 arrest.

Earlier this morning, attorneys haggled over the admission as evidence of body-worn camera footage captured by Minneapolis Park Police Officer Peter Chang the night of Floyd's May 25, 2020, arrest, for which he was present.

Prosecutors asked for certain portions of the video to not be played in court, including one that shows Chang speaking with the other passengers from the car Floyd was travelling in that night. Their conversation contains hearsay, the prosecution said.

Another part of the video shows personal information of Floyd's on the computer screen inside Chang's squad car that, according to the proseucution, would not be appropriate to make public.

Cahill said that the video could be admitted as evidence but asked that the Floyd's personal information be redacted from view.

8:30 a.m. Defense could begin its case today

Before jurors were brought into the courtroom Monday morning, Nelson requested the jury be sequestered before deliberations began and to re-question the jurors following the fatal police shooting of a 20-year-old man in Brooklyn Center, Minn., Sunday afternoon, April 11, during a traffic stop. Special Assistant Attorney General Steve Schleicher opposed the motion. Judge ultimately denied the defense's request.

The death of Daunte Wright prompted protests Sunday night that turned into violence. Gov. Tim Walz on Monday set a curfew in several Metro counties as a precaution against any civil unrest.

Judge Peter Cahill on Monday notified jurors that Derek Chauvin's defense team would likely begin its case sometime today, Tuesday, April 12. Jurors were also told that closing arguments would come Monday, April 19, and with it the sequestration of the jurors would also begin. Jurors will be sequestered until a verdict is reached.

Also Monday, jurors heard testimony from a use-of-force expert, a cardiologist and George Floyd's brother, Philonise Floyd, who provided "spark of life" testimony. All were called as witnesses by the prosecution, which has begun winding down its case.

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