Why do we celebrate Halloween the way we do? Halloween developed from an ancient pagan festival celebrated by Celtic people over 2,000 years ago in the area that is now the United Kingdom, Ireland, and northwestern France. The festival marked the start of the dark winter season and was celebrated around November 1. In the A.D. 700s to 800s, the Christian church established a new holiday, All Saints’ Day or All Hallows’ on this date. The name All Hallows’ Eve eventually evolved into Halloween. Americans take Halloween seriously, if you are getting into the spirit of the day come into your library to find celebratory ideas or just fiction stories on the topic.

"The Halloween Tree" by Susan Montanari is available at the Detroit Lakes Public Library. (Submitted photo)
"The Halloween Tree" by Susan Montanari is available at the Detroit Lakes Public Library. (Submitted photo)

“The Halloween Tree,” by Susan Montanari: A charming, funny, and warm-hearted picture book that will help to start a new tradition. Everyone knows most young saplings dream of becoming Christmas trees. But one grumpy, old tree who doesn't like lights, decorations, or people is determined to be different. Get ready to meet the Halloween Tree!

"Origami for Halloween" by Robyn Hardyman is available at the Detroit Lakes Public Library. (Submitted photo)
"Origami for Halloween" by Robyn Hardyman is available at the Detroit Lakes Public Library. (Submitted photo)

“Origami for Halloween,” by Robyn Hardyman: Even though for many kids Halloween is most associated with trick-or-treating, this holiday hasn't always been about candy. In fact, it's a very old holiday, and a lot of its traditions have lasted many years. Readers will enjoy learning about Halloween's roots while making origami projects to decorate for today's celebrations. A ghost, witch's hat, bat, and jack -o'-lantern are just some of the great paper-folding crafts readers can try by following clear, concise instructions. Full-color photographs guide them through each step and show off the spooky, completed origami.

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Library Happenings

Storytime: Preschoolers and their caregivers are invited to join us for Storytime on Thursday, Oct. 31 and Saturday, Nov. 2 at 10:30 a.m. A different theme is explored each week. Daycares and other large groups are asked to call ahead.

The Detroit Lakes Library has scheduled a free workshop and demonstration featuring a trainer and service dog from the Patriot Assistance Dogs program, which provides highly trained, certified psychiatric service dogs to qualified U.S. Military veterans. The workshop will be held Monday, November 4 at 7 p.m. at the Detroit Lakes Public Library, 1000 Washington Ave. Admission is free with no registration required. To learn more about the requirements and to register, please contact Danell at the Detroit Lakes Library by calling 218-847-2168.

All Lake Agassiz Regional Library (LARL) branches and LINK sites will be closed on Monday, Nov. 11 in observance of Veterans Day. Regular hours of operation will resume Tuesday, Nov. 12.

Library hours

The library’s regular hours are as follows: Monday-Thursday, 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; Friday, 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; and Saturday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. It is closed on Sundays and all national holidays.

Detroit Lakes Library is a branch of Lake Agassiz Regional Library (LARL), a consolidated public library system comprised of 13 branch libraries and nine LINK sites serving the residents of seven counties in northwest Minnesota. More information is available at www.larl.org, and the library’s app, LARL Mobile, is available in the iTunes and Google Play stores for free download.

For more information on local library services and programs, call 218-847-2168 or visit the Detroit Lakes Public Library at 1000 Washington Ave. Information is also available online at www.larl.org.