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DL man hosting Global March for Elephants, Rhinos and Lions

A Detroit Lakes man known locally for his knowledge of the law is now earning a reputation for his love of endangered animals. Attorney Jack Fay has been involved with efforts to bring awareness to poaching crimes against elephants, rhinos and li...

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Jack Fay is pictured with his safari guide in Masai Mara, Kenya. SUBMITTED PHOTO

A Detroit Lakes man known locally for his knowledge of the law is now earning a reputation for his love of endangered animals. Attorney Jack Fay has been involved with efforts to bring awareness to poaching crimes against elephants, rhinos and lions for several years now, but he says as the situation has gotten “more critical,” he’s amping up those efforts. He is joining a grassroots effort across the world called Global March for Elephants, Rhinos and Lions, and is now spearheading the effort in Minnesota with a march down in the Twin Cities. “I’ve been interested in this since I was a child, but it took a long time to develop what I thought I really needed to do,” said Fay. “And and I think I have become more and more active as it has become more of a crisis, and it really is that - a crisis.” Fay and a small network of people across the area are putting the event together at the north end of Como Lakeside Pavilion in Como Park in St. Paul on Oct. 4 at 9:30 a.m. This will be the third annual event for the cause, which is being held in 120 other cities all over the world, but it will be the first time the March for Elephants, Rhinos and Lions will be held in Minnesota. “We’ve done things informally before, but this is the first time we’ve had an event like this to bring awareness and education,” said Fay. “We’ll get refreshments and walk around the lake there, we might have a little music and a comedian who might do a little something to lighten the mood.” Fay says even if 100 people showed up, he would deem the event a success, although he hopes for more. His ultimate goal, he says, is to help put a stop to the unlawful slaughter of endangered animals in Africa.
“They call it ‘blood ivery’ because ivory and rhino horn are so valuable to these poachers that it’s on an equivalent scale to gold or illicit drugs,” said Fay. “And it finds its ways into the hands of terrorists because they’re able to get arms by trading ivory or money from the ivory.” Fay says he knows there are a lot of great causes out there to support, but he finds himself latching onto this one because he hopes it helps the animals, humans and a much larger, global issue. “(It’s) the concept of ‘keystone species,’ or a species that plays a crucial role in the functioning of the ecosystem and the detrimental effects of not having that species any longer,” said Fay, who says elephants and rhinos are on threatened and protected species lists, but African countries are not enforcing them. “Because they think it’s going to damage tourism there,” said Fay, who says between that and the tremendous amount of money that filters into poachers hands, the only hope to stop it is to squash the market for it. Fay says by educating the public on the issue, he hopes to get lawmakers’ attention and help eliminate the market for ivory, which is traded some in the U.S. and tremendously in the Asian countries, particularly China which uses approximately 70 percent of the poached ivory. Fay, who sponsors an orphaned elephant through the Sheldrick Wildlife Fund and who has spent time on an African safari with a guide learning more about the issue, says one elephant is killed every 15 minutes in the African continents. One hundred elephants are killed every day, and approximately 35,000 elephants are killed every year. He says one rhino is killed every 7 to 11 hours, and with every adult female elephant and rhino that is killed, it is likely her babies will not survive either. Fay says this is why he believes extinction for these animals “looms within a generation.” “And I want my granddaughter to grow up and know there are still things in the wild when she’s an adult that were there when grandpa was around,” said Fay. Although Fay says donations to the cause are always welcome, he says the event at Como Lake isn’t about “putting out their hats,” but is simply about getting the word out about what is happening and how to help stop it. To find out more, log onto march4elephantsandrhinos.org or “like” the event page on Facebook. Tweets by @DLNewspapersA Detroit Lakes man known locally for his knowledge of the law is now earning a reputation for his love of endangered animals.Attorney Jack Fay has been involved with efforts to bring awareness to poaching crimes against elephants, rhinos and lions for several years now, but he says as the situation has gotten “more critical,” he’s amping up those efforts.He is joining a grassroots effort across the world called Global March for Elephants, Rhinos and Lions, and is now spearheading the effort in Minnesota with a march down in the Twin Cities.“I’ve been interested in this since I was a child, but it took a long time to develop what I thought I really needed to do,” said Fay. “And and I think I have become more and more active as it has become more of a crisis, and it really is that - a crisis.”Fay and a small network of people across the area are putting the event together at the north end of Como Lakeside Pavilion in Como Park in St. Paul on Oct. 4 at 9:30 a.m.This will be the third annual event for the cause, which is being held in 120 other cities all over the world, but it will be the first time the March for Elephants, Rhinos and Lions will be held in Minnesota.“We’ve done things informally before, but this is the first time we’ve had an event like this to bring awareness and education,” said Fay. “We’ll get refreshments and walk around the lake there, we might have a little music and a comedian who might do a little something to lighten the mood.”Fay says even if 100 people showed up, he would deem the event a success, although he hopes for more. His ultimate goal, he says, is to help put a stop to the unlawful slaughter of endangered animals in Africa.
“They call it ‘blood ivery’ because ivory and rhino horn are so valuable to these poachers that it’s on an equivalent scale to gold or illicit drugs,” said Fay. “And it finds its ways into the hands of terrorists because they’re able to get arms by trading ivory or money from the ivory.”Fay says he knows there are a lot of great causes out there to support, but he finds himself latching onto this one because he hopes it helps the animals, humans and a much larger, global issue.“(It’s) the concept of ‘keystone species,’ or a species that plays a crucial role in the functioning of the ecosystem and the detrimental effects of not having that species any longer,” said Fay, who says elephants and rhinos are on threatened and protected species lists, but African countries are not enforcing them.“Because they think it’s going to damage tourism there,” said Fay, who says between that and the tremendous amount of money that filters into poachers hands, the only hope to stop it is to squash the market for it.Fay says by educating the public on the issue, he hopes to get lawmakers’ attention and help eliminate the market for ivory, which is traded some in the U.S. and tremendously in the Asian countries, particularly China which uses approximately 70 percent of the poached ivory.Fay, who sponsors an orphaned elephant through the Sheldrick Wildlife Fund and who has spent time on an African safari with a guide learning more about the issue, says one elephant is killed every 15 minutes in the African continents. One hundred elephants are killed every day, and approximately 35,000 elephants are killed every year. He says one rhino is killed every 7 to 11 hours, and with every adult female elephant and rhino that is killed, it is likely her babies will not survive either. Fay says this is why he believes extinction for these animals “looms within a generation.”“And I want my granddaughter to grow up and know there are still things in the wild when she’s an adult that were there when grandpa was around,” said Fay.Although Fay says donations to the cause are always welcome, he says the event at Como Lake isn’t about “putting out their hats,” but is simply about getting the word out about what is happening and how to help stop it.To find out more, log onto march4elephantsandrhinos.org or “like” the event page on Facebook.Tweets by @DLNewspapers

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Fay also sponsors Naipoki, an orphaned elephant at the Sheldrick Trust nursery, which is now nearly 5 years old and almost ready to be released back into the wild. SUBMITTED PHOTO

Paula Quam joined InForum as its managing digital editor in 2019. She grew up in Glyndon, Minnesota, just outside of Fargo.
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