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New family medicine specialist with obstetrics at Essentia Health in Detroit Lakes

“When it became time to choose my field, it was obvious that rural family medicine would allow me to be the doctor I always dreamed of becoming,” she said. “Health care is a partnership and I look forward to building relationships in this community and with my future patients.”

Elaina Hintsala.jpg
Elaina Hintsala
Contributed/Jeff Frey
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DETROIT LAKES — Essentia Health St. Mary’s-Detroit Lakes is proud to welcome Dr. Elaina Hintsala, a family medicine specialist with obstetrics.

“I was lucky enough to train with Essentia during residency in Duluth, Minnesota,” Hintsala said. “I felt supported in the system and excited about the opportunities they provided, so when I started looking for jobs, it was an easy decision to stay with Essentia.”

She received her medical degree from the University of Minnesota Medical School in the Twin Cities and completed her residency with the Duluth Family Medicine Residency Program.

“When it became time to choose my field, it was obvious that rural family medicine would allow me to be the doctor I always dreamed of becoming,” Hintsala said. “Health care is a partnership and I look forward to building relationships in this community and with my future patients.”

To schedule an appointment with Dr. Hintsala, call (218) 844-2347. To see her full profile, visit EssentiaHealth.org and click on “Doctors & Providers.”

Detroit Lakes Tribune newsroom
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