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Stauber launches reelection campaign

He filed his statement of candidacy for 2022 in July.

Pete Stauber
Pete Stauber
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U.S. Rep. Pete Stauber, R-Minn, launched his re-election campaign Monday, making official what has long been expected.

In a video posted to YouTube titled "Enough is Enough," the congressman from Hermantown attacked Democrats for a litany of issues, including their response to the pandemic, border security and economic policies. He vowed to maintain gun rights and oppose abortion rights, among other issues.

"Together, let's return our country to what made her great. Together, let's rise up and stand strong," Stauber said. "Our country depends on it, our future depends on it and our children depend on it."

The former Duluth police officer and St. Louis County commissioner was first elected to represent the 8th Congressional District in 2018, flipping it from Democratic to Republican control. He was reelected in 2020 by a 19-point margin.

Stauber filed his statement of candidacy for 2022 in July. He has already raised $1 million for the 2022 campaign with almost $740,000 cash on hand, the Federal Election Commission reported in the most recent figures available.

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So far, only one challenger has entered the race against Stauber.

In November, Theresa Lastovich, of Chisholm, filed her statement of candidacy. She officially kicked off her campaign earlier this month.

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