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Letter: MnDOT's reasons for tree-cutting on Hwy 34 make no sense to me

The trees are just standing there, giving off oxygen, eating toxins and providing beauty. I don't understand why they have to be cut down. I recently took a trip to northern Minnesota, driving on Highway 200 and there are miles of trees embracing the road. Please leave our scenic highway as it is for other generations to enjoy.

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DETROIT LAKES — I just read the “Groups determined to stop tree removal'' article posted in Detroit Lakes Tribune on Sept. 21. The story says the group wants to understand the Minnesota Department of Transportation’s reasons for cutting trees.

MnDOT’s reasons are tree removal will reduce the use of road salt during winter months, decrease deer collisions, and lessen the chance of fatalities from crashes into trees.

If roads without trees do not need as much salt, then I don't understand why Highway 10 and Interstate 94 need salt, why the TV news the night before will telecast that the trucks are out putting salt down, when these highways have no trees at all.

Deer love grass and that's why so many are found in ditches, so I don't understand how tree removal and clear cutting will prevent deer collisions. There will be a brand new restaurant open for them, and I would bet they will dine all winter long on the new shoots of trees and shrubs that will be coming up through the snow.

In order to hit a tree with a car, one has to leave the road. I don't understand what made the vehicle leave the road to begin with – were they driving too fast? Did they fall asleep? Were they using their phone?

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The trees are just standing there, giving off oxygen, eating toxins and providing beauty. I don't understand why they have to be cut down. I recently took a trip to northern Minnesota, driving on Highway 200 and there are miles of trees embracing the road. Please leave our scenic highway as it is for other generations to enjoy.

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