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Successful fishing experiments that are working this fall

The fall season is Chad Koel's time to experiment with soft plastics and build confidence as an angler with the more aggressive fish.

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The last couple of falls have been Chad Koel's favorite time to go fishing.

"The fish are extremely aggressive, they are feeding extraordinarily hard for the winter and to be quite honest, its the easiest time to catch a lot of big fish," the Northland Outdoors video host says.

It's Koel's time to experiment with soft plastics and build confidence as an angler with the more aggressive fish.

Koel says panfish will school up more in the fall and with two or three microplastics ready, once the fish are located, it's go time.

The range is extreme, he says. Fish like simple shapes in natural colors or the brightest, most outlandish shapes that can make a fish strike.

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"Don't limit yourself on location either. Baitfish are still spread out all over," he says.

Koel plastics.jpg
Chad Koel's assortment of artificial baits. Contributed / Chad Koel

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Koel fish.jpg
Chad Koel holds a largemouth bass he caught with artificial bait. Contributed / Chad Koel

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