ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

WATER QUALITY

Latest Headlines
The Sackett v. EPA case marks another attempt to pin down what is a waters of the U.S., or WOTUS, an issue that has been debated for years with the legal ambiguity a thorn in the side of farmers and ranchers, property developers and others seeking clarity on how not to run afoul of federal law.
The Sackett v. EPA case marks another attempt to pin down what is a waters of the U.S., or WOTUS, an issue that has been debated for years with the legal ambiguity a thorn in the side of farmers and ranchers, property developers and others seeking clarity on how not to run afoul of federal law.
The clinic is set for Aug. 10 and 11.
The Fond du Lac and Grand Portage Bands of Lake Superior Chippewa filed the suit Thursday in federal district court. It seeks to overturn the EPA’s approval last October of the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency’s recent overhaul of its Class 3 and Class 4 water quality standards.
Members of the Lake Detroiters Association held their 77th annual meeting at Detroit Lakes High School on Saturday, which featured presentations on aquatic invasive species, an update on weed collection and the election of new board members.
Known as “forever chemicals” for their persistence in the environment, PFAS have been popular with manufacturers for decades and can be found in everything from nonstick cookware coating to fire-extinguishing foam. Higher levels of exposure to PFAS have been linked to increased cancer risk, developmental delays in children, damage to organs such as the liver and thyroid, increased cholesterol levels and reduced immune functions, especially among young children.

ADVERTISEMENT

Lowell Deede, a retired wildlife biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Office, began volunteering for the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) in 2015, collecting water samples and measuring water clarity.
PFAS are a group of more than 5,000 chemicals used in products such as nonstick cookware, fast food wrappers, pizza boxes and cosmetics such as eyeliner and foundation. Increasing evidence suggests they are harmful to humans and the environment.
Minnesota health department and pollution control officials estimate the state will need to spend $12.5 billion over the next 20 years to keep up with waste and drinking water needs.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT